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Topic Double sided stockinette stitch - how? Go to previous topic Go to next topic Go to higher level

By little edie On 11/14/02  

I am a fairly new knitter and have been making simple scarves lately. I have been examining some in stores and have seen ones that have a stockinette stitch look on *both* sides - the little "v"s on each side. When I do a regular stockinette one side has "v"s and one has the lumpy ol' garter stitch. How do you get the "v"s on each side? It looks so much more pro!



By violet On 11/14/02  

goodness, you can do that? Is it flat or a tube? Tube is the only way i can see that possible, but I'm not a super dooper expert knitter.



By teagrrl On 11/15/02  

I have a scarf like that too, but I think it's knit in a tube or sewn together (so, you could make one by knitting a scarf that is twice as wide as you want it, then fold it in half length-wise and sew it shut).



By cat_in_the_hat On 11/15/02  

The scarves might also be done with shaker knitting, which lets you get a stockinette look on both sides. There's a good explanation of how to do it in "Big Book of Knitting" I haven't seen it explained anywhere else, but that doesn't mean it hasn't been done (it just means I need to read more knitting books). I haven't done enough of it myself to venture a detailed explanation here. Or it might even be 1x1 rib- the purl bits often sort of squeeze together on ribbing so the knit bits are more obvious.



By cat_in_the_hat On 11/15/02  

The scarves might also be done with shaker knitting, which lets you get a stockinette look on both sides. There's a good explanation of how to do it in "Big Book of Knitting" I haven't seen it explained anywhere else, but that doesn't mean it hasn't been done (it just means I need to read more knitting books). I haven't done enough of it myself to venture a detailed explanation here. Or it might even be 1x1 rib- the purl bits often sort of squeeze together on ribbing so the knit bits are more obvious.



By little edie On 11/15/02  

I have seen some that are tubes, but they are that tiny machine knitted stitch, so it's not so bulky, but that's not what I mean. I am seeing this double sided stitch in a lot of the nice, big, bulky scarves and it's just mocking me!!!! I will take a look around for shaker knitting instructions and hopefully it's easy to do...
Thanks for the info!

While were on finickity stitch-talk, I have what may be a silly question:
I have learned to knit basically from books and there is something I can't get straight. When you do a 'knit' stitch only, you get a loopy garter stitch. When you knit one row, purl the next you get stockinette. What mixes me up: in a stockinette stitch it's always the "v" side that is referred to as the knit side, the loopy side is called the purl side. This is super confusing and backwards to me - have I just been reading it wrong? Which side is which?
Also, I have been figuring that the odd numbered rows are the "front" of the piece, is this right?
It's the really really simple stuff they don't explain! Thanks in advance!



By bonnell99 On 11/15/02  

Most machine made scarves that look like double sided stockinette, and are clearly not two layers, are really a 1x1 rib (k1, p1, repeat). The purl stitches recede, and all you see are the knits.

(Also, The best way to edge these scarves is to slip the first stitch of each row to make a chain selvedge.)

Shaker knitting produces a similar effect, but the purl "valleys" don't recede all the way, so it actually looks like a varient of ribbing (which it kind of is). Also, shaker stitches eat up yarn like you wouldn't believe.

As for knit versus purl:
Look at the construction of the stitch. When you make a knit stitch, one side is a V, and the other side is a horizontal bump. When you make a purl, one side is a horizonatal bump, and the other is a V. Knit and purl are just variations of the same thing--when you're purling, you're making the knit stitch backward, or vice versa.

the loopy sides of garter and stockinette are different creatures--

So take a look at your garter stitch. Pull the piece vertically so you can see clearly--it's made up of horizonatal ridges. On side A, the prominent part of the ridge is the purl bump that's created when you knit a row on side B. The valley is the knit V you made when you knit a row on side A.

(f you were making garter in the round, where only the "right" side faces you, you'd have to knit a round, and then purl a round to get the ridges)

Now look at your stockinette stitch--you knit a row (right side) and then you purl a row (wrong side). All the knit rows, and the reverses of the purls make up the plain V fabric. All the purl rows and the reverses of the knits make up the bumps.

Pull the stockinette piece vertically, and note you don't have any of the garter-type ridges.

A lot of books don't explain this basic stitch construction, but they should. It's something that makes "reading" your knitting, fixing mistakes and generally getting better at the skill much easier to do. Some of the few authors that does explain this, are Elizabeth Zimmerman (Knitting without Tears and others), Maggie Rhigetti, and Priscilla Gibson Roberts.

Oh, for the odd numbered rows? It depends on the stitch pattern and how it's written, and which side you want to be "right". So if it's stockinette, any knit row is the "right side" whether that's row 1 or row 2, depends on which you did first.


Jen






By Del On 11/15/02  

When I do scarves, most of the time, I do a rib. K1 P1 then on the other side, I purl the knit stitched and knit the purls. I'll cast on an even number and then k1 p1 the whole way through.

This makes the little v's on both sides, and it's a little bulkier than stockinette. Y'know for warmth.



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